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Why Get Vaccinated?

Doctor discussing with her female patient on the possible options

When you have diabetes you are more prone to infection due to an abnormal immune system. As the body’s defence system is not functioning well, persons with diabetes have a higher risk of getting serious problems or even die from a simple infection such as flu or pneumonia.

Vaccinations are safe and can prevent or reduce the severity of flu or pneumonia. The side effects are mild and usually go away quickly.

Related: All You Need to Know About Vaccinations

What Vaccines Do I Need?

Different types of vaccination in bottles

Here are two vaccines to consider[1]:

Vaccine

Who Needs This?

How Often?

Influenza

Everyone over six months of age

Yearly

Pneumococcal

All persons above two years old who have diabetes

Once

Some people may need additional vaccines such as those listed below[2].

Vaccine

Who Needs This?

How Often?

Hepatitis B

Adults from 19 to 59 years old

One series of three injections

Zoster

Adults 60 years and older

Once regardless of whether there is a prior exposure to herpes zoster

Tetanus

All adults

Every 7 to 10 years

Related: Immunisation Chart Based on Age

What is the Next Step?


See your doctor before you get a vaccination. Your doctor will check to make sure your vaccinations are up to date.

There are people who should not get vaccinated, such as those with a serious allergic reaction to a vaccine or any ingredient in the vaccine. Others may have diseases or take medications that weaken their immune system.

When you next see your doctor, ask about vaccinations. It’s the best way to protect yourself against infections.

HPB thanks Prof Khoo Chin Meng from the National University Health System for his input to this article.


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References

  1. Society of Infectious Diseases Singapore, Institute of Infectious Diseases and Epidemiology, College of Family Physicians Singapore, C. of I. D. P. (2016). Clinical Practice Guidelines on Adult Vaccination in Singapore, 1st edition. [PDF].
    Retrieved September 2016 from http://ams.edu.sg/view-pdf.aspx?file=media%5C3075_fi_366.pdf&ofile=Adult%2BVaccination%2BGuidelines_HR2+One+PDF.pdf

  2. Centres for Disease Control and Prevention. (2016, May 2). Diabetes Type 1 and Type 2 and Adult Vaccination [Website].
    Retrieved September 2016 from http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/adults/rec-vac/health-conditions/diabetes.html