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Stop and Reverse Pre-diabetes

Find out more about pre-diabetes and how you can reverse it by making some changes to your lifestyle.

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See How Some Singaporeans Have Managed Their Condition

Smitha succeeded in reversing her pre-diabetes and BEAT diabetes with her daughter
Jade Seah realized that she and her brother were at risk of having diabetes and took the action right away
Encik's foot had to be amputated due to complications, find out how he managed diabetes
Nizam's sight and kidney began to fail due to his condition and he's inspiring yout to BEAT diabetes
Diabetes can affect anyone so take the DRA now because early detection can make a difference
Smitha succeeded in reversing her pre-diabetes and BEAT diabetes with her daughter
Smitha continues success in reversing pre-diabetes

Smitha’s dad had type 2 diabetes and she was diagnosed with pre-diabetes. Find out what contributed to her success and how she and her daughter bonded while they BEAT diabetes together.

Jade Seah realized that she and her brother were at risk of having diabetes and took the action right away
Jade Seah is not leaving anything to chance

Jade’s dad was diagnosed with diabetes in his 30s. When she realized she and her brothers were at risk, she took action right away. Find out how the dynamic duo BEAT diabetes together.

Encik's foot had to be amputated due to complications, find out how he managed diabetes
Encik Alias is taking charge now

When he was first diagnosed, he didn’t change his eating or lifestyle habits. His foot had to be amputated due to complications arising from diabetes. Find out how he is managing his condition now and how his family is supporting him through this journey.

Nizam's sight and kidney began to fail due to his condition and he's inspiring yout to BEAT diabetes
Nizam's turn in waking others to the dangers of youth

At only 24, Nizam was surprised when he found out that he had diabetes. He took his condition lightly, until his sight and kidney began to fail. Today, Nizam is inspiring youths to BEAT diabetes.

Why take the risk?

Diabetes can affect anyone, but early detection CAN make a difference. Take the Diabetes Risk Assessment (DRA) now—it takes only 2 minutes of your time to know your risk.

Take 2 Minutes To Check Your Risk

The DRA is developed for those between 18 to 39 years old. If you are 40 years and older, go for regular screening every three years at your regular GP clinic or screening events held in the community. You can visit screenforlife.sg for more information on screening subsidies.

You Can B.E.A.T. Diabetes Too

  • Be aware of managing diabetes
  • Eat right for better diabetes management
  • Having an active lifestyle helps manage diabetes better
  • Take control of your diabetes and lead a fulfilling life

Know your risk and
screen for diabetes

Diabetes can damage both your nerves and blood vessels and lead to kidney, eye, foot, heart diseases and stroke. Detect early with Screen for Life.

Find out more about screening subsidies
Join the challenge, make healthier choices and reap the rewards

Pre-Diabetes and Types of Diabetes

Pre-diabetes describes a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered Type 2 diabetes. In other words, it is the precursor to Type 2 diabetes. The good news is studies have shown that a few lifestyle changes, such as adopting a healthier diet, regular exercise and maintaining a healthy weight can reverse pre-diabetes, as well as reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes.

Pre-diabetes is when your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as Type 2 diabetes. Studies show that if people with pre-diabetes lose weight and maintain a healthy Body Mass Index (BMI), adopt a healthy diet and engage in regular physical activity, they can reduce their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is usually found in people aged 40 and above who are overweight and physically inactive. In some people, the condition is mild and they are able to control their blood glucose with just diet and exercise. However, if the condition gets worse, they may require oral medication or insulin injections in addition to making lifestyle changes. For those who are overweight or obese, losing weight can be significantly beneficial, even if it is a small amount.

Usually inherited and cannot be prevented. Occurs when the pancreas cannot produce insulin. Hence, people with Type 1 diabetes need insulin injections daily.

Due to the hormonal changes in pregnancy, some women may show high blood glucose levels during pregnancy. These women require specialised obstetric care to prevent complications to the unborn child. In gestational diabetes, the blood glucose levels often return to normal after delivery. However, these women may be at an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes later in life.

Risk Factors

Diabetes can affect anyone. Knowing your risk of diabetes will help identify the changes you need to make to your lifestyle. You are at an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes if you:

You're at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes if your parent or sibling has one

Have a parent or
sibling with diabetes

You're at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes if you have high BMI

Have a BMI of
23.0 kg/m2 or higher

You're at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes if you lead an inactive lifestyle

Lead an inactive
(sedentary) lifestyle

You're at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes if you have abnormal blood cholesterol

Have abnormal blood
cholesterol/lipid levels

You're at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes if you have a history of gestational diabetes

Have a history of
gestational diabetes

You're at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes if you're 40 years old and above

Are 40 years old
and above

You're at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes if you have impaired glucose tolerance

Have impaired glucose tolerance or
impaired fasting glucose

Screening

Diabetes is a ‘silent’ disease in its early stages, and you can feel perfectly well until complications occur. However, a late diagnosis can result in serious and irreversible complications that could have been otherwise prevented through screening. It is therefore important to get yourself screened even if you feel perfectly healthy and experience no symptoms, for regular health screening is the best way to detect diabetes early and obtain timely treatment.

Going for Screening

Screening for chronic diseases, including diabetes, is recommended under HPB's Screen for Life programme for those 40 years old and above. It is conducted through a non-fasting or fasting blood glucose test, done once every three years.

  • Screening is recommended for people 40 years old and above for better diabetes management
  • Screening is recommended once every 3 years for better diabetes management

Under HPB's Screen for Life programme offered by most CHAS GP clinics, chronic disease screening (including the doctor consult charges) is available at the following subsidised rates:

If you are a Pioneer Generation cardholder, screening test is will be $0

Pioneer GenerationIf you are a Pioneer Generation cardholder, the
screening test and the first post screening
consultation (if assessed that a consultation is
required) will be $0.

If you are a Merdeka Generation cardholder, screening test is will be $2

Merdeka GenerationIf you are a Merdeka Generation cardholder, the
screening test and the first post screening
consultation (if assessed that a consultation is
required) will be $2.

For CHAS blue or orange cardholder, 40 years old and above, you only need to pay $2 for the screening test

Community Health Assist Scheme (CHAS) Card Holders If you are a CHAS cardholder (blue or orange
card), you will only need to pay $2 for the
screening test and the first post screening
consultation (if assessed that a consultation is
required). Applicable for both males and
females aged 40 and above.

Eligible Singaporeans, 40 years old and above, only need to pay $5 for screening test

Other Eligible Singaporeans You will only need to pay $5 for the screening
test and the first post screening consultation (if
assessed that a consultation is required).
Applicable for both males and females aged 40
and above.

Permanent residents only need to pay $10 excluding GST for screening test applicable at CHAS GP clinics

Permanent Residents You will only need to pay $10 (excluding GST)
for the screening test. The prevailing doctor
consultation rates will be charged accordingly
by the respective CHAS GP clinics.

*These rates are only applicable at CHAS GP clinics for the screening tests that are covered under the enhanced Screen for Life subsidies.

Health Screening at Clinics

Health screening is available at many private medical clinics and polyclinics. Visit our directory for the list of screening locations, or click here to locate your nearest CHAS GP clinic offering SFL screening services.

Learn more about the screening tests and subsidies you are eligible for at screenforlife.sg.

Visit screenforlife.sg

Tests and Diagnosis

Your doctor may conduct three types of blood glucose tests for diabetes.

Your doctor may conduct HbA1c blood glucose test for diabetes diagnosis
HbA1c

HbA1c is a blood test that gives an indication of your average blood glucose/sugar levels over the past three months. You do not need to fast on the day of the test.

Your doctor may conduct a fasting blood glucose test for diabetes diagnosis
Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG) Test

This is a blood test usually done in the morning, as it requires a fast of at least 8 hours before the blood sample is taken.

Your doctor may conduct an oral glucose tolerance test for diabetes diagnosis
Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT)

An oral glucose tolerance test consists of two blood tests; the first administered after an 8-hour fast, and the second 2 hours after consuming a sugary beverage.

Myths and Facts

There are many myths about diabetes which people think to be true. This can be harmful as it leads to an incorrect understanding of diabetes. Get the facts below, and learn more about this chronic disease.

MYTH
Diabetes is caused solely by eating too much sweet food.
FACT

Diabetes occurs when the body fails to produce enough insulin – the hormone responsible for reducing blood glucose levels. Although eating sweet food does not directly cause diabetes, a diet high in sugar and fat can lead to obesity, which causes the body to be less sensitive to insulin, thus increasing the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.

MYTH
Pre-diabetes is not serious and I do not need to do anything about it.
FACT

Don’t be fooled by the “pre” in pre-diabetes. The condition affects 1 in 7 Singaporeans and puts them at increased risks of developing Type 2 diabetes, heart disease or stroke.

But it is not too late to turn things around and take control. Some lifestyle adjustments, such as committing to a healthy diet, including more physical activity and losing weight can do a lot in preventing or delaying the onset of diabetes.

MYTH
Diabetes can be cured.
FACT

Unfortunately, diabetes is a chronic medical condition that has no cure. The good news is it can be managed with some lifestyle changes and, in some cases, medication.

There are two types of diabetes, Type 1 and Type 2. People with Type 1 diabetes are unable to produce insulin due to a disorder affecting the pancreas. They require regular insulin injections to control their blood sugar levels. Type 1 diabetes cannot be helped by lifestyle changes alone, but maintaining a healthy lifestyle is still important in keeping it in check.

On the other hand, people with Type 2 diabetes are able to produce insulin, but it may not be enough or they become resistant to it. Lifestyle changes are crucial in managing Type 2 diabetes. Doctors may also prescribe oral medication or insulin injections, or a combination of both.

In contrast, pre-diabetes can be reversed with lifestyle changes.

MYTH
People with diabetes will eventually have their feet amputated.
FACT

Amputation refers to the removal of a limb or parts of a limb (e.g. foot) as a result of gangrene or death of body tissues from poor blood flow. It happens in people with long standing diabetes that is poorly controlled. People who take care of themselves by going for regular check-ups, taking medication, and living healthy lifestyles can avoid such complications.

MYTH
People with diabetes should avoid carbohydrates at all costs.
FACT

Carbohydrates are a main source of energy essential for metabolism and well-being. Instead of actively avoiding carbohydrates to control blood sugar levels, people living with diabetes should be more careful about the type and amount of carbohydrates they consume, as well as the time of consumption. Diabetic individuals should get sufficient carbohydrates, preferably the complex type from whole grains like brown rice. They should also have their meals at regular times.

MYTH
People with diabetes can safely consume snacks that have “no added sugar”.
FACT

Snacks and candies labelled “no added sugar” or “suitable for diabetics” may seem safer than regular snack food, but the sugar could be replaced by artificial sweeteners. Such snacks may also be higher in fat and calories than their regular counterparts. Always be aware of the ingredients in processed food and limit your consumption of foods that are high in fat and sugar.

MYTH
People with diabetes feel unwell.
FACT

Not everyone with diabetes feels unwell. In fact, many people with diabetes do not have any symptoms, particularly during the early stages of the condition. They can have diabetes for months, even years, without knowing it. This is why it is important to go for regular health check-ups, so that you can detect the condition early.

MYTH
Alkaline water is beneficial in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases such as diabetes
FACT

There is currently no conclusive evidence that ionised alkaline water is beneficial to health. Individuals can achieve good health by adopting and maintaining a healthy lifestyle, which includes the following:

  • Consume a balanced diet rich in fruits, vegetables, wholegrains and low in fats and sugar.
  • Adopt a physically active lifestyle by exercising regularly
  • Maintain a healthy body weight with a BMI of no more than 23 kg/m2
  • Quit smoking and limit alcohol intake

Signs and Symptoms

People with Type 2 diabetes can feel well and not experience any symptoms at all. However, there may also be symptoms that develop gradually and are sometimes so mild they go unnoticed, such as the following:

Having blurred vision is a sign and symptom of type 2 diabetes

Having
blurred vision

Feeling thirsty despite drinking lots of water is a sign and symptom of type 2 diabetes

Feeling thirsty despite
drinking lots of water

Poor healing of cuts and wounds is a sign and symptom of type 2 diabetes

Poor healing of
cuts and wounds

Feeling tired is a sign and symptom of type 2 diabetes

Feeling
tired

Feeling hungry all the time is a sign and symptom of type 2 diabetes

Feeling hungry
all the time

Losing weight despite good appetite is a sign and symptom of type 2 diabetes

Losing weight
despite good appetite

Frequent urination is a sign and symptom of type 2 diabetes

Frequent passing
of urine

Itchy skin is a sign and symptom of type 2 diabetes

Itchy skin especially
around the genital area

Complications

The high blood glucose (hyperglycemia) levels in uncontrolled diabetes can damage both nerves and blood vessels. As blood vessels supply blood to various organs, this can eventually lead to complications such as:

High blood glucose levels in uncontrolled diabetes can eventually lead to complications like kidney disease

Kidney disease

High blood glucose levels in uncontrolled diabetes can eventually lead to complications like foot disease

Foot disease such as
numbness, ulcers, and even gangrene

High blood glucose levels in uncontrolled diabetes can eventually lead to complications like eye disease

Eye disease

High blood glucose levels in uncontrolled diabetes can eventually lead to complications like nerve disease

Nerve disease which can lead to problems such as erectile dysfunction and diarrhoea

High blood glucose levels in uncontrolled diabetes can eventually lead to complications like heart disease

Heart disease such as
angina and heart attack

High blood glucose levels in uncontrolled diabetes can eventually lead to complications like stroke

Stroke

Make healthier choices and reap the rewards

Choose more wholegrains, fruit and vegetables, as well as less sugar and saturated fat. Join the Eat, Drink, Shop Healthy Challenge for more rewards!

Join the Challenge
Join the Eat, Drink, Shop Healthy Challenge for more rewards

Eating Right is Eating Well

Eating right whatever your age and condition is helps manage diabetes better

Whatever your age and condition, eating well has its benefits. A healthy diet and lifestyle can increase your mental sharpness, energy levels, and resistance to illness and disease.

Eating healthy is about a well-rounded diet that helps manage diabetes better

Healthy eating doesn’t have to be about bland and boring food. Eating well should be about a well-rounded diet that follows the principles of a healthy diet. It should be balanced, made up of fresh and tasty food, and above all, enjoyed — whether in the company of family or friends.

Use My Healthy Plate as a helpful guideline for better diabetes management

A helpful guideline is My Healthy Plate, a friendly visual tool to help you create healthy and balanced meals.

Use My Healthy Plate

Fill half of your plate with fruit and vegetables
Eating right by filling half plate with fruit and vegetables helps in better diabetes management

Naturally low in fat and rich in vitamins, minerals and fibre, fruit and vegetables add colour, texture, and flavour to your diet. With so many fruit and vegetables in the market, mix and match your choices to get maximum benefit. Remember not to overcook vegetables, and go for whole fruit rather than fruit juices.

Fill a quarter of your plate with wholegrains
Eating right by filling a quarter of your plate with wholegrains helps in better diabetes management

Wholegrain foods such as brown rice, wholemeal bread, and rolled oats contain nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, and inulin. Not only do they protect you from heart diseases and diabetes, they also help manage your weight as they fill you up and you get hungry less easily. On the other hand, refined grains such as white rice and white bread have gone through processing, which removes the valuable nutrients. They also cause a greater increase in your blood glucose levels after a meal.

Fill a quarter of your plate with meat and others
Eating right by filling a quarter of your plate with meat and others help in better diabetes management

Protein such as yogurt, cheese, lentils, legumes, nuts, and seeds are essential for growth and repair of damaged tissues. Protein is also needed in the production of hormones and enzymes. To make a healthier choice, select items lower in fat, cholesterol, and salt.

Choose Water

Replacing sweetened drinks with water

To feel fuller and stay slimmer, replace sweetened drinks with water and also drink a glass of water before meals. Drinking water improves blood circulation and prevents muscle cramps so you can engage in regular physical activity and stay healthy. In Singapore’s hot and humid climate, it is important to keep yourself well-hydrated.

Choose water over sweetened drinks for better diabetes management

Limit Alcohol

Alcoholic drinks are a high source of calories

Aim for no more than two drinks per day if you are female, and three drinks per day if you are male. A standard drink is one can (330 ml) of beer, one glass (100 ml) of wine, or one nip (30 ml) of spirits. Beer, wine, and hard liquor contain alcohol – a high source of calories. Regular binge drinking adds inches to your belly and increases your risk of diabetes and heart diseases.

Limit your alcohol intake for better diabetes management

Use Healthier Oils

A diet high in fat increase risk of diabetes

Choose unsaturated fats and oils that are healthier, and reduce intake of saturated and trans fats. A diet high in fat can contain calories, thus increasing the risk of obesity and diabetes.

Choose unsaturated fats and oils for better diabetes management

Know Your Food Groups

If you have diabetes, it is important that you understand how different foods affect your blood glucose levels. Foods are classified into four food groups and they are:

Knowing your food groups like carbohydrates is important when you have diabetes for better management
Carbohydrates

(starches and sugars)

Knowing your food groups like fruits and vegetables is important when you have diabetes for better management
Fruits and vegetables
Knowing your food groups like meat and others is important when you have diabetes for better management
Meat and others

(fish, tofu, chicken, beans and nuts, milk and dairy products)

Knowing your food groups like fats and oils is important when you have diabetes for better management
Fats and oils

To keep your blood glucose levels within a steady healthy range, choose meals and snacks from each food group every day. The amount of food you consume is just as important as the type of food so learn to control your portion sizes.

Great things start when you MOVE IT!

Physical activity is important to health. Get started with HPB's island-wide physical activity programmes and get more from life today!

Join Programmes
Great things start when you move it

Benefits of Physical Activity

Want to know what you stand to gain if you stay active? The benefits of being physically active are plenty:

Physical activity helps you manage your weight for better diabetes management
Helps manage your weight
Physical activity helps you keep your heart, lungs and bones healthy for better diabetes management
Keeps your heart, lungs and bones healthy
Physical activity makes you feel good for better diabetes management
Makes you feel good
Physical activity keeps diseases away for better diabetes management
Keeps disease away

Before you start planning an exercise routine, take some time to learn more about the variety of physical activities and the benefits they can provide for your body. You will then be able to combine physical activities and get the most out of your exercise routine.

Choose activities that you enjoy and love doing to fit your lifestyle.

Recommended Minutes Per Week

To gain health benefits, it is recommended that a healthy person engage in either:

150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity a week is recommended for diabetes management
moderate-intensity aerobic activity a week

OR

20 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity for 3 days a week is recommended for diabetes management
vigorous-intensity aerobic activity 3 or more days a week

The good news is you can:

COMBINE MODERATE AND VIGOROUS-INTENSITY aerobic activity a week for more variety

AND

DO THE AEROBIC ACTIVITY IN SEGMENTS of at least 10 minutes and not have to complete 20 or 30 minutes at one go

Besides aerobic activity, you should also engage in activities that strengthen your muscles two or more days a week. Start with lighter weights or fewer repetitions, and slowly increase the weight over time. A repetition refers to a complete movement of an activity, or the number of times you perform an exercise movement; e.g. 10 sit-ups = 10 repetitions, 15 squats = 15 repetitions. Choose activities that work on different large muscle groups.

Aerobic Activity - Benefits and Examples
Doing aerobic activity helps strengthen your muscles for better diabetes management
Aerobic activity makes you breathe harder and your heart beat faster
Benefits
  • Increases heart and lung fitness
  • Controls weight
Examples

Brisk walking, dancing, cycling, jogging, swimming, and playing badminton

Muscle-Strengthening Activity - Benefits and Examples
Doing muscle-strengthening activity helps strengthen your muscles for better diabetes management
Muscle-strengthening activity works on the major muscle
groups – the legs, back, chest, belly, shoulders, and arms
Benefits
  • Increases bone strength and muscular fitness
  • Controls weight
  • Improves balance
Examples

Push-ups, pull-ups, sit-ups, and squats, working with resistance band and weight training

Levels of Intensity

Intensity refers to how hard your body is working during aerobic activity.

Moderate-intensity aerobic activity
You are still able to talk but not sing or whistle, and are perspiring
Doing moderate-intensity aerobic activity like brisk walking helps manage diabetes

Brisk walking (5 km/hr)

Doing moderate-intensity aerobic activity like leisure cycling helps manage diabetes

Leisure cycling (<16 km/hr)

Doing moderate-intensity aerobic activity like leisure swimming helps manage diabetes

Leisure swimming

Doing moderate-intensity aerobic activity like playing badminton helps manage diabetes

Playing badminton (doubles)

Doing moderate-intensity aerobic activity like line dancing helps manage diabetes

Line dancing

Vigorous-intensity aerobic activity
You find yourself breathing hard and fast, and find it hard to hold a conversation with someone
Doing vigorous-intensity aerobic activity like jogging or running helps manage diabetes

Jogging or running

Doing vigorous-intensity aerobic activity like fast-paced cycling helps manage diabetes

Cycling at a fast pace

Doing vigorous-intensity aerobic activity like swimming continuous laps helps manage diabetes

Swimming continuous laps

Doing vigorous-intensity aerobic activity like playing badminton helps manage diabetes

Playing badminton (singles)

Doing vigorous-intensity aerobic activity like playing football or basketball helps manage diabetes

Playing football or basketball

FOR YOUR SAFETY: If you have a medical condition, are very overweight or obese and/or have not been exercising for a long time, see your doctor before you start an exercise programme.

Take control today and reverse pre-diabetes!

To help you take better control of your health, we have curated a list of programmes to support you through your journey to BEAT diabetes.

Programmes to help you manage diabetesProgrammes for You
Pre-diabetes can be reveresed

Aim for a Healthy Weight

Being overweight puts you at risk of numerous health problems including diabetes. Here are some things you should know about why it's important to maintain a healthy weight and how to manage your weight effectively.
Maintain a healthy weight for better diabetes management
How To Achieve A Healthy Weight

In order to achieve a healthy weight, it is important to first understand the dangers of obesity. Obesity is a condition in which excess body fat accumulates and puts you at risk of a variety of health problems. This excess fat may reduce life expectancy and increase the risk of other health problems - so it is vital to maintain a healthy weight.

Know Your BMI

There are many ways to measure body fat. However, the simplest is by calculating your Body Mass Index (BMI). BMI measures the relationship between your weight and height to measure the amount of body fat you have. The higher your BMI, the higher the amount of fat in your body.

Keep an eye on your BMI
Calculate your BMI and keep your BMI in the healthy range (18.5 – 22.9 kg/m2) through an active lifestyle and healthy eating.

The higher your BMI, the higher the amount of fat in your body
Calculate Your BMI

Are you in the healthy range? Use this tool to calculate your Body Mass Index (BMI) now to know your health risk.

A BMI value of 23 and above indicates that your weight is outside of the healthy weight range for your height. Find out more on how to achieve and maintain a healthy BMI through a healthy and active lifestyle.

Calculate your body mass index to know your health risk
Losing Weight The Right Way

Weight management is all about energy balance. To maintain your weight, you must balance the amount of energy you get from food and drinks with the amount of energy your body uses for daily physical activity.

Consuming more calories than you need will lead to weight gain
Weight Gain
Weight management is all about calorie balance
Weight Management
Burning more calorie than you consume will lead to weight loss
Weight Loss

Consuming more energy than you need will lead to weight gain, while burning more energy than you consume will lead to weight loss.

Quit Smoking

Smokers are more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. People with diabetes who smoke experience more problems with their diabetes control than those who don’t. They are also more likely to end up with diabetes complications.

What’s more, smoking damages the blood vessels and reduces blood flow to many organs. So if you have diabetes and smoke, you are at a higher risk of serious complications, such as heart disease, amputation, and stroke.

If you do not smoke, continue to stay smoke-free and enjoy the health benefits it brings.

If you smoke, make the decision to quit smoking today. The good news is that there is a range of support strategies to help you quit smoking. It is a matter of finding the right one for you.

Try Health Promotion Board's I Quit 28-Day Countdown to help you quit smoking and better manage diabetes
Choose a quit method that suits you best
Choose a quit smoking method like cold turkey to better manage diabetes

Quit “cold turkey”

Choose to gradually cut down your number of cigarettes to better manage diabetes

Gradually cut down on the number of cigarettes

Seek professional help for quitting smoking to better manage diabetes

Seek professional help

Use nicotine replacement therapy for quitting smoking to better manage diabetes

Use nicotine replacement therapy

Take medication for quitting smoking to better manage diabetes

Take medication

Attend self-help group to help you quit smoking and better manage diabetes

Attend a self-help group

Whichever method you choose, remember there’s no magic formula to quitting.
For professional help, call QuitLine at 1800 438 2000.

You will be encouraged to know that many people make several attempts to quit smoking before they manage to successfully break free from the habit. So if you fail to quit on the first attempt or experience any relapses long the way, do not give up and try again.

To learn more

Mental Well-Being

Stress can raise blood pressure and blood glucose levels. It can also affect how well you manage medical conditions. Here are some tips to improve your mental well-being:

Besides causing you to lose focus and increasing the risk of accidents, sleep deprivation has been linked to several health conditions including heart disease, high blood pressure, stroke, and diabetes. Lack of sleep may be associated with an increase in hunger and appetite, as well as obesity. If you experience problems sleeping and it is affecting your personal and work life, see a doctor to rule out underlying medical conditions.

The way you think affects how you feel about people, things and situations as well as how you respond to them. The ability to think positive and embrace optimism is linked to many health benefits. It doesn’t suggest burying your head in the sand and ignoring problems you have. Positive thinking simply means that you approach the negative things in life in a more positive and productive manner. Not only does it help you cope better with stressful situations, it also reduces the harmful effects stress has on your body. It is also believed that positive people tend to take better care of themselves. They eat more healthily, get more physical activity, do not smoke, and do not drink alcohol in excess.

Being mindful is to be aware of your thoughts, feelings and environment, moment by moment. Instead of harping on the past or worrying about the future, mindfulness brings your attention to the present – helping to clear your mind of mental clutter and focus on positive feelings and thoughts. Take time to breathe in and breathe out, to savour the food you eat, or simply to enjoy the sunset – these are all simple and effective ways of being mindful.

Stress, especially chronic stress, can have a negative effect on blood glucose levels. People under stress tend not to take care of themselves. They may drink and eat excessively, exercise less or not have enough sleep. They may forget or not have the time to check their blood glucose or prepare healthy meals.

RESOURCES

Screen For Life  

Screen For Life

Get screened today. Find out what screenings are best for you and your loved ones.

HealthHub. Your Health. In Your Hands.  

Your Health. In Your Hands.

With HealthHub Track by your side, you have everything you need to take control and beat diabetes.

Know Your BMI  

Know your BMI

Take the right steps and BEAT diabetes. Start by calculating your BMI.


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Stop and Reverse Pre-diabetes
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