Periodontal Disease and General Health

Periodontal or gum disease can affect your health in many ways. Read on to find out more.

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​Periodontal disease and general health

Women and Periodontal Disease

Hormonal fluctuations or changes that occur during puberty, menstruation, pregnancy and menopause may affect the gums and increase a woman's risk to periodontal disease. Any pre-existing periodontal disease can become more severe.

During puberty, increased level of hormones such as progesterone and oestrogen cause increased gum sensitivity, leading to a greater reaction to food particles and the presence of plaque. The gums become swollen, turn red and may feel painful to touch.

Some women experience similar symptoms 3 to 4 days prior to their period. Others may experience menstruation gingivitis, which is characterised by bleeding gums, a bright red swelling of the gums between teeth and sores or ulcers in the mouth. The symptoms usually clear up once the period starts.

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Periodontal Disease and General Health

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