Font Sizes:

STAY ONE STEP AHEAD WITH VACCINATIONS

Protect yourself and your loved ones from vaccine-preventable diseases like influenza and pneumococcal disease. There is no reason why anyone should suffer from the serious complications vaccine-preventable diseases can cause. Your best defence against such diseases is getting vaccinated.

Prevent What's Preventable with Vaccination

FIND THE VACCINES RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

Select the appropriate age group and gender to get a list of vaccines recommended for you and your loved ones.

MY AGE GROUP IS
MY GENDER IS

Get more information on available subsidies here.
Click here to view the National Adult Immunisation Schedule.
The schedule was developed based on the recommendations of the
Expert Committee on Immunisation (ECI).

MY AGE GROUP IS
MY GENDER IS

Get more information on available subsidies here.
Click here to view the National Childhood Immunisation Schedule.
The schedule was developed based on the recommendations of the
Expert Committee on Immunisation (ECI).

GERMS ARE EVERYWHERE

We live in a world where you can find germs almost everywhere. And even though you may not realise it, your body is in a never-ending battle fighting these germs as and when it is exposed to them.

The part of your body responsible for this is your immune system – and it is strengthened when you get vaccinated.

VACCINES TRAIN YOUR BODY

When you get vaccinated, you teach your body how to fight diseases. Think of it like a training session. Your body learns to recognise and handle these germs as if you have caught the disease. So, if and when you are actually exposed to the germs in the future, your immune system will remember how to fight it.

If you are infected before you get vaccinated, you are at risk of falling seriously ill. The infection can lead to complications, disabilities and even death.

Strengthen Your Immunity With Vaccination

If you generally lead a healthy lifestyle by exercising regularly and eating healthily, and hardly fall sick, you may have a good immune system. However, it may not be enough to ensure that you can fight an infectious disease. Vaccinations help build your immune system by strengthening it against serious infectious diseases.

Vaccines Imitate Germs

Vaccines imitate germs and in doing so, train your body to recognise and fight real germs if and when you are exposed to them.

Immune Response Is Triggered

Your immune system is triggered to respond, helping you build immunity against the disease.

Extra Training Needed

Sometimes, the immune system needs more than one training session to learn how to fight the disease effectively. In these cases, a few doses of the vaccine may be necessary over a period of time. To ensure that you are protected, it is important to get vaccinated as per the recommended timings and not delay it.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Expand all | Collapse all

Our immune system produces immunity following vaccination, similar to how it would after a “natural” infection.

The difference is that you do not get sick first when you get the vaccination. Vaccines help strengthen your immune system and protect you from potentially life-threatening complications.

Hence, it is highly recommended that you and your loved ones get vaccinated according to the national immunisation schedules.

The following groups of people are more susceptible to falling seriously ill from infectious diseases:

  1. a.Seniors aged 65 and above & young children
    The immune systems of the elderly may have weakened and may not function as well as they used to. For young children, their immune systems may not be fully developed yet.
  2. b.People with medical conditions
    Adults and children with certain medical conditions may be recommended to get vaccinated as per National Adult Immunisation Schedule (NAIS) and National Childhood Immunisation Schedule (NCIS). This is because they may be at a higher risk of developing complications from an infection. Examples of recommended vaccinations are influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. Check with your doctor if you have medical conditions such as diabetes and heart diseases.
  3. c.Pregnant women
    Vaccinations can also protect pregnant women and the foetus, and this protection can also be passed along to the child during his/her early life. It is advisable to ensure that you are up to date with the recommended vaccinations before getting pregnant, so as to prevent what is preventable. There are also vaccinations that are recommended during pregnancy such as the Tdap (Tetanus, reduced diphtheria and acellular pertussis) and influenza vaccinations. Pregnant women should consult their doctor on the vaccinations they need.

All vaccines, as with any medicines, can have side effects. Mild side effects, such as low-grade fever or pain and redness at the site of injection are expected and will go away on their own. Severe side effects are very rare. Getting vaccinated is much safer than getting the infections or complications that result from these infections.

Globally, vaccines are assessed by the relevant authorities to ensure they meet the required standards of quality, safety and efficacy before they are approved for use, based on the best scientific evidence available. Vaccines for use in Singapore are registered with the Health Sciences Authority (HSA). Following approval of the vaccines, their safety is still closely monitored, and any safety concerns are investigated.

Yes. The National Adult Immunisation Schedule (NAIS) and National Childhood Immunisation Schedule (NCIS) were developed based on recommendations of the Expert Committee on Immunisation, which comprises specialists from various disciplines such as infectious diseases, microbiology, paediatrics and public health as well as representatives from both the public and private healthcare institutions.

This committee regularly reviews the immunisation programmes in Singapore. The committee also closely follows the recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO).

The reason why Singapore is now free from many vaccine-preventable diseases is because of its effective and successful vaccination programme.

Click here to find a CHAS GP clinic to make an appointment.

You may also click here to make an appointment at a polyclinic via the HealthHub login page.
You will need your SingPass to login.

Make an appointment with your clinic, so they can make sure that vaccines are available.

To improve the affordability and accessibility of vaccinations, the MOH has enhanced subsidies*# for vaccinations recommended under the National Adult Immunisation Schedule (NAIS) at CHAS GP clinics and polyclinics. Examples of eligible Singaporeans includes adults with certain medical conditions/indications, or seniors aged 65 and above, as recommended under the NAIS.

At CHAS GP Clinics
From 1 November 2020, eligible adult Singaporeans benefit from higher subsidies of $35 to $125 for nationally-recommended vaccinations, listed on the Subsidised Vaccine List (SVL), administered at CHAS GP clinics.

Eligible adult Singaporeans who fulfil the age, gender and vaccination history requirements, and/or have the medical conditions/indications as recommended under the National Adult Immunisation Schedule (NAIS), will only need to pay up to the following amounts for the range of nationally-recommended vaccinations at CHAS GP clinics, after government subsidies:


Click here to view a larger image

*Refer to the National Adult Immunisation Schedule (NAIS) for the recommended age and medical conditions/indications and vaccination history.

#Applies to certain vaccine brands. Please refer to the MOH website for the latest subsidised vaccine brands.


At polyclinics
Eligible adult Singaporeans will receive up to 75% subsidy for National Adult Immunisation Schedule (NAIS) vaccinations. Pioneer Generation and Merdeka Generation seniors will also receive an additional 50% and 25% subsidy off their subsidised vaccination bills, respectively.

Patients can use MediSave to help pay for the remaining co-payment of recommended vaccinations under the NAIS. Patients aged 60 and above can also tap on Flexi-MediSave.

Individuals are advised to check with their healthcare providers on their eligibility for subsidies and prices of vaccinations.

Full subsidies* for vaccinations under the National Childhood Immunisation Schedule (NCIS) are available for eligible Singaporean children at CHAS GP clinics and polyclinics. Getting children vaccinated with the recommended vaccinations under the NCIS can be done together with Childhood Developmental Screening at recommended age touchpoints, which are fully subsidised for eligible Singaporean children at these clinics too.

*Applies to certain vaccine brands. Please refer to the MOH website for the latest subsidised vaccine brands.

Individuals are advised to check with their healthcare providers on their child’s eligibility for subsidies.

Adults (18 years old and above)
Adults aged 65 years and above
Those aged 65 years and above are recommended to get the influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations. This group is eligible for subsidies at CHAS GP clinics and polyclinics. Influenza vaccination is recommended annually or per season.

Adults aged 18 to 64 years
For those aged 18 to 64 years, persons who meet the conditions below are recommended to get the influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations and are eligible for subsidies. Individuals are advised to check with their healthcare providers accordingly.

  1. Influenza vaccination (18 to 64 years old)
    Recommended and eligible for subsidies if the individual has any of the following conditions or indications:

    1. Chronic disorders of the pulmonary or cardiovascular systems, including asthma;
    2. Requires medical follow-up or hospitalisation due to chronic metabolic diseases (including diabetes mellitus), renal, neurologic, hepatic, or haematologic disorders;
    3. Immunosuppression (including immunosuppression caused by medications, HIV or other immunodeficiencies);
    4. Persons aged 18 years (as well as those below 18 years under the NCIS) who are receiving long term aspirin therapy and therefore might be at risk for developing Reye syndrome after influenza infection;
    5. Women at all stages of pregnancy; or
    6. Persons receiving Intermediate and Long Term Care (ILTC) services.
    Influenza vaccination is recommended annually or per season.
  2. Pneumococcal vaccination (pneumococcal conjugate 13-valent, PCV13)(18 to 64 years old)
    Recommended and eligible for subsidies if the individual has any of the following conditions:

    1. Cochlear implant or cerebrospinal fluid leak;
    2. Anatomic or functional asplenia (including conditions such as homozygous sickle cell disease and coeliac syndrome that may lead to splenic dysfunction); or
    3. Immunosuppression (including immunosuppression caused by medications, HIV or other immunodeficiencies).
  3. Pneumococcal vaccination (pneumococcal polysaccharide 23-valent, PPSV23)(18 to 64 years old)
    Recommended and eligible for subsidies if the individual has any of the following conditions:

    1. Chronic pulmonary, cardiovascular, renal or liver disease, or diabetes mellitus;
    2. Cochlear implant or cerebrospinal fluid leak;
    3. Anatomic or functional asplenia (including conditions such as homozygous sickle cell disease and coeliac syndrome that may lead to splenic dysfunction); or
    4. Immunosuppression (including immunosuppression caused by medications, HIV or other immunodeficiencies).

Children/ Adolescents (6 months to 17 years old)

  1. Influenza vaccination
    Influenza vaccination is recommended for all children who are 6 to 59 months old (<5 years old). The vaccine is recommended annually or per season. Singaporean children that fall within this age group are eligible for full vaccination subsidies at CHAS GP clinics and polyclinics.

    Influenza vaccination is recommended for children and adolescents aged 5 to 17 years old, annually or per season, if they have a specific medical condition. Children and adolescents aged 5 to 17 with any of the following conditions are recommended to get the influenza vaccination:

    1. Chronic disorders of the pulmonary or cardiovascular systems, including asthma;
    2. Require medical follow-up or hospitalisation due to chronic metabolic diseases (including diabetes mellitus), renal, neurologic, hepatic, or haematologic disorders;
    3. Immunosuppression (including immunosuppression caused by medications, HIV or other immunodeficiencies); or
    4. Are receiving long term aspirin therapy and therefore might be at risk for developing Reye syndrome after influenza infection.

    For this group of children and adolescents, individuals are advised to check with their doctor if influenza vaccination is recommended and if their child is eligible for the subsidies.

  2. Pneumococcal vaccinations
    Pneumococcal vaccination (pneumococcal conjugate 10-valent or 13-valent, PCV10 or PCV13) is recommended for all children and fully subsidised for Singaporean children at CHAS GP clinics and polyclinics. Previously unvaccinated healthy children aged <5 years and older children with certain medical conditions are recommended to receive PCV. If the child has not been previously vaccinated, individuals are advised to consult their doctor to check if the vaccine is still recommended for their child.

    Another type of pneumococcal vaccine (pneumococcal polysaccharide 23-valent, PPSV23), is recommended for children and adolescents aged 2 to 17 years who have any of the following medical conditions:

    1. Chronic pulmonary, cardiovascular, renal or liver disease, or diabetes mellitus;
    2. Cochlear implant or cerebrospinal fluid leak;
    3. Anatomic or functional asplenia (including conditions such as homozygous sickle cell disease and coeliac syndrome that may lead to splenic dysfunction); or
    4. Immunosuppression (including immunosuppression caused by medications, HIV or other immunodeficiencies).

    For this group of children and adolescents, individuals are advised to check with their doctor if PPSV23 is recommended and if their child is eligible for the subsidies.

Medical practitioners are requested to notify the National Immunisation Registry of vaccinations carried out.

Singaporeans who are born in 1996 or later are able to access their vaccination records via HealthHub with their SingPass. Those who are born earlier (i.e. before 1996) are able to access their vaccination records^ via HealthHub from November 2020 onwards. In the absence of vaccination records and if individuals are not able to recall their vaccination history, they are advised to discuss with their healthcare providers on their vaccination needs.

^ Records are only available for vaccinations under the National Adult Immunisation Schedule (NAIS), which were given on or after 1 Nov 2017, and notified accordingly.

163
STAY ONE STEP AHEAD WITH VACCINATIONS